The Dominic Cummings Story

Dominic Cummings is Boris Johnson’s de facto chief-of-staff

Hollie Adams/Getty Images

 

I strongly recommend Emily Maitlis’s BBC2 Television Programme,

Taking Back Control: The Dominic Cummings Story. To some he is an evil genius, to others a master strategist. This film examines Dominic Cummings’s place in our politics over the last two decades, from Blair to Brexit and beyond. David Gauke and Rory Stuart, who opposed a hard Brexit and were thrown out of the party, take part. 

 

The film confirms my view that Brexit is an abuse of the UK’s democracy and that we have been taken for a ride. It was a great conspiracy. We were told lies such as the £350 million savings a week we’d make by leaving the EU; illegal money and misleading social networking were used in the campaign. Behind it all was Dominic Cummings. He had ready collaborators in the form of Nigel Farage, Michael Gove and Boris Johnson, all of whom are clearly narcissists. Is Cummings’s power legitimate in a democracy? Is it in accord within the spirit of our unwritten constitution? One of my friends said to me, “He should be had up for treason”.

It can be argued that Dominic Cummings has the characteristics of a sociopath. Adolph Hitler was an extreme example, as psychoanalyst Walter C. Langer in his book Adolf Hitler described Hitler as a “neurotic psychopath.” Let us beware.

 

Brexit is the will of the British people is complete nonsense, as I have argued elsewhere. There were many discontents underlying the vote for Brexit, including the failure to enable the rebuilding of the economies of large areas of the UK, especially in our former industrial heartlands of the North.

 

I quote the BBC’s description of the programme: “For critics and supporters alike, Boris Johnson’s chief adviser – the man who is said to have masterminded Brexit – is an enigma. Dominic Cummings is perhaps the most powerful unelected political figure in Britain today, but what does he actually believe? What has shaped his approach to politics and the media? And what can his rise to power tell us about how politics has changed?

 

In this programme, Emily Maitlis examines Dominic Cummings’s place in our changing political landscape, stretching back over two decades.

 

With testimonies from some of his fiercest critics and closest political friends, Emily Maitlis sheds light on a man whose ambitions may now direct Britain’s journey for years to come.

The film charts his arrival in Downing Street as a senior adviser with significant and perhaps unprecedented power. Now, at the apex of the largest Conservative majority since 1987, Cummings aims to play a key role in reshaping the nation, our economy and government”.

 

See what the critics say: BBC 2’s new documentary on Boris Johnson’s chief adviser Dominic Cummings promised to “shed light on a man whose ambitions may now direct Britain’s journey for years to come”. But some critics aren’t impressed: see Taking Control: The Dominic Cummings Story. “The view from all sides seems to be that Cummings is awful. It’s just that some people think he’s brilliant, and so put up with him being awful.” Naturally, I would select the following comments, amongst others which are critical of the programme: “Dominic Cummings was a brooding puppet master. A new documentary shows nothing has changed.” Lebby Eyres said the documentary “seems to confirm what I’ve thought all along: it’s not really our Prime Minister Boris Johnson who’s in charge, but Dom”.

 

Meanwhile, we are involved in two crises, namely the climate catastrophe and Covid 19. We need to work closely with our fellow European neighbours and it is ironic that we are embarking on doing the opposite.

 

I am an author, writer and speaker. I give participative talks in communities, universities, schools and at conferences. My latest book, The 21st Century Revolution – A Call to Greatness was Oxford Alumni Book of the Month for November 2016. Professor Katherine J. Willis, CBE, Principal of St Edmund Hall and Professor of Biodiversity, Department Zoology, University of Oxford said “I am greatly enjoying it; you write beautifully”. I update the book through my Blog which includes many other topics too.

If you find what you have read useful, please spread the word.

 

 

 

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